Missoula Demonstration Project / Life's End Institute

Missoula MT
       

Source:

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

$1,310,258

$522,437
33718 Byock, Ira Robert Targeted End-of-Life Projects Initiative

Missoula, MT: (1 year).

1997 $53,675
30794 Byock, Ira Robert Supplementary funds for Missoula demonstration project on the quality of life's end

(for 1 year).; Missoula, MT

Missoula Demonstration Project Inc.

1999 $699,146
36677 Norris, Kaye Missoula Demonstration Project

http://www.lastacts.org/scripts/la_res01.exe?FNC=grantDetail__Ala_res_grant_user_view_html___495

"The Missoula Demonstration Project (MDP) was established in March 1996, to research the experience of dying persons and their families and to demonstrate that a community-based approach of excellent medical care and psychological, social, and spiritual support can consistently improve the quality of life among those who are dying and their families. Over the past year, the MDP has focused on administration and data analysis of the surveys it has conducted, including a retrospective clinical profile of 250 deaths, a faith community leaders survey, a Native American experience assessment, and administration of community and physicians' surveys in a comparison city of Laramie, Wyoming. Additional results are being finalized for the prospective and retrospective clinical profiles, family bereavement interviews, community focus groups, and patient and family caregiver surveys. As the project details the lessons learned, the focus will turn to communication and dissemination of the findings. The development of a strategic communications plan will enable the MDP to share its research tools, methodology, and community engagement strategies (with families, institutions, and agencies) with national and local colleagues.

 

2001 $35,000
42313 Byock, Ira Robert Missoula Demonstration Project, Inc.
       

Source: Partnership for Caring $300,000

2002 $300,000
Consulting (listed on PfC's Form 990)

2002 Form 990, "Compensation of the five highest independent contractors…"
       

Source: Open Society Institute / Project on Death in America (Soros Foundation) $50,000

$50,000
Byock, Ira Robert Missoula Demonstration Project

http://www2.soros.org/death/delivery_models.htm

Project: A long-term, community-based organization which came together to study and transform the culture and experience of dying. Research will be done to define the attitudes, expectations, and experiences related to death and dying in Missoula County, Montana. The results will provide the platform for future interventions and research in the next 15 years focused on bringing quality to life's end.

Probably granted circa 1997. See http://www.lifes-end.org/mediastories/missoula_experiment.phtml
       

Source: Nathan Cummings Foundation, Inc. $710,000

1995 $10,000
Spring, Barbara K. Missoula Demonstration Project

http://www.missoulian.com/specials/dying/challenges.html

In the fall of 1995, a funder came to town. Andrea Kydd of the Nathan Cummings Foundation became a "fairy godmother." She asked Byock, "What can I do?" and he asked her to fund Barbara Spring for three months. The fledgling effort got its first $10,000 on Dec. 10.

 

1997 $400,000
Byock, Ira Robert Demonstration project

To demonstrate, in practice and through research, that quality of life can be preserved during the dying process and that superior care of patients and their families can be provided in a cost-effective manner.

 

2000 $100,000
Byock, Ira Robert Missoula Demonstration Project

Renewal support: To engage the community of Missoula in an effort to demonstrate that quality of life can be preserved for people who are dying and their caregivers.

 

2001 $50,000
Hanson, Mark J. Support MDP ($ paid in 2001)

reference: Cummings' Form 990-PF (I am guessing Mark Hanson was the contact)

To diversify and expand MDP's funding base.

2001 $100,000
Hanson, Mark J. Support MDP ($ paid in 2001)

reference: Cummings' Form 990-PF (I am guessing Mark Hanson was the contact)

"To research the experience of dying and the determinants of quality at life's end, and to demonstrate a

community-based approach of excellent physical, psycho-social, and spiritual care to improve the quality of life for

2002 $50,000
Hanson, Mark J. Technical Assistance

reference: Mark Hanson's cv

Source: Mayday Fund $150,000

1996 $150,000
Torma, Linda Missoula Demonstration Project, Inc.

http://www.painandhealth.org/mayday/previous-grants.html

http://www.painandhealth.org/mayday/previous-grants.html

Missoula Demonstration Project

Missoula, Montana

$39,048, the final payment in a three year $150,000 grant to improve the assessment and treatment of pain in the

community of Missoula.

Contact: Linda Torma, RN, MSN

E-mail: LtormaMDP@aol.com
       

Source: Engelhard Foundation (Charles) $30,000

1999 $30,000
Byock, Ira Robert Enhancing the Sacred at the End of Life and During Bereavement

http://www.lifes-end.org/annual_report/recent/recent_highlights.phtml
       

Source: United States Department of Commerce - Technology Opportunities Program $461,180

2001 $461,180
Hanson, Mark J. Choices Bank Program (Advance directives online database)

http://ntiaotiant2.ntia.doc.gov/top/details.cfm?oeam=306001045



award number: 30-60-01045

start-end date: October 1, 2001 - March 31, 2005

total project cost: $923,520

federal share: $461,180

contact: Ms. Lillian Tuholske

address: 320 East Main Street

Missoula, MT 59802

phone: (406) 728-1613

e-mail: lilyt@lifes-end.org



Project Description



The Choices Bank project is a collaborative project among Missoula-area health care institutions to create an electronic repository for advance health care directives. The Bank will store advance directives, in the form of living wills and durable powers of attorney, on a secure website that will be accessible to authorized individuals. Portals to deposit advance directives from the public for the Choices Bank will be developed at 22 area health care institutions in Western Montana, which serve more than one-quarter of Montana's population. The Choices Bank will use off-the-shelf hardware and software to make the latest copy of a person's advance directive universally accessible to anyone with security clearance, from anywhere, at anytime. Health care providers are required by law to ask patients if they have advance directives, but are not required to assist patients in storing or retrieving the directives. The Choices Bank project will be a community-based effort to use technology to make advance directives accessible to family members and health care providers at the time they are needed.

 

Project Significance:

The Missoula Demonstration Project: The Quality of Life's End (MDP) is an organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for dying people and their families. A community task force organized by MDP identified access to advance directives as a significant barrier to honor health care choices at life's end. The task force has developed the concept of the Choices Bank to address this barrier. The project will significantly improve the current plight of seriously injured or ill people and their families. These families are thrust into stressful decision-making roles and conflict within families is prevalent when patients cannot communicate, and evidence of their wishes cannot be found. In a two-year study of the medical charts of deceased persons, MDP found that fewer than 50% of those who were reported to have advance directives actually had them in their charts. This is because people store their directives in locations such as law offices or banks, where they are inaccessible evenings, weekends, or holidays. The Choices Bank project, with its 22 portals located in familiar community health care facilities, will make it significantly easier for people to get their advance directives written and stored in a manner that will make them accessible when they are needed. Choices Bank will implement relatively inexpensive software and hardware; this will facilitate its replication by other communities who want to ensure that their citizens' wishes are honored at the time of their death.

Partners

The partners include the Missoula Demonstration Project, Missoula's two hospitals, Western Montana Clinic and its satellites, Missoula Aging Services, Partners in Home Care, Nightingale Nursing Services, and a faith community.
Compiled 09/04/05 4:13 pm